Craniosynostosis Before & After Photos


Craniosynostosis Before & After Case 1

This young man has a history of craniosynostosis with cranial vault remodeling.

Over time, even a forehead which has been overcorrected may still be narrow compared to the rest of the skull at full skeletal maturity.

In this case, he was doing well without any need for expanding his intracranial volume.

This meant that we were able to avoid another extensive remodeling, and could perform a camouflage procedure with some calcium putty to fill in the depression.

Here you can see him several months after surgery, with the forehead and temple contour filled in. It is also a good time to improve on old scars as well.

Craniosynostosis Before & After Case 2

Craniosynostosis is a condition where the sutures (or seams) of the skull close prematurely. The normal growth from the sutures is stopped.

The other growth plates work to keep up with the growth of the brain. But as more sutures are fused, the risk of excessive, harmful pressure increases.

This can affect development and lead to blindness.

This patient has bicoronal synostosis, where two sutures that go across the front of the scalp like a hair band are both fused.

This can lead to a characteristic short skull from front to back. As the other sutures work overtime, this can also lead to a much taller skull.

For this patient, posterior vault distraction was performed. This involves the release of the skull with our neurosurgeons. Immediately some decompression of the brain was seen.

After that, distractors were implanted and used. These provide gradual movement of the bone edges apart. The space in between fills in with bone, and the scalp is gradually stretched and adapted to the increased volume.

After the bone has some time to consolidate, or harden, the hardware is removed.

Craniosynostosis Before & After Case 3



Craniosynostosis is a condition where the sutures (or seams) of the skull close prematurely. The normal growth from the sutures is stopped.

The other growth plates work to keep up with the growth of the brain. But as more sutures are fused, the risk of excessive, harmful pressure increases.

This can affect development and lead to blindness.

This patient has bicoronal synostosis, where two sutures that go across the front of the scalp like a hair band are both fused.

This can lead to a characteristic short skull from front to back. As the other sutures work overtime, this can also lead to a much taller skull.

For this patient, posterior vault distraction was performed. This involves the release of the skull with our neurosurgeons. Immediately some decompression of the brain was seen.

After that, distractors were implanted and used. These provide gradual movement of the bone edges apart. The space in between fills in with bone, and the scalp is gradually stretched and adapted to the increased volume.

After the bone has some time to consolidate, or harden, the hardware is removed.

Craniosynostosis Before & After Case 4



Craniosynostosis is a condition where the sutures (or seams) of the skull fuse too early. These growth centers for the skull respond to the growing brain, making sure there is enough space to avoid excessive pressure.

The more sutures that are fused, the higher the risk of excessive pressure on the brain and nerves. This may affect development, and can lead to pressure on the optic nerves and result in blindness.

Treatment for this condition depends on which sutures and how many are involved, the age of the patient, and any sign of excess pressure.

Here, the sagittal suture fused early. This results in a more narrow skull, as the top of the head is unable to widen. The skull also progressively lengthens as the other growth centers make up the difference.

A strip craniectomy was performed, meaning the affected suture was removed.

This allows the brain and skull to continue growing without restriction. A helmet afterwards helps to protect that soft spot, and to guide growth.